“If men want to make war in the Holy Land, there will be war. If they want, they can also make peace”

The book, “Milk, honey and falafel,” by journalist Elisa Pinna, was presented in Rome.

The United States has moved its embassy to Jerusalem. It’s a decision made by President Donald Trump that has resulted in violence and greater tension in a land that, in reality, is called to be the cradle of peace.

Given the radicalization of the opposing sides, it is becoming even more necessary to strengthen the Christian presence, in order to prevent the situation from getting worse.

ELISA PINNA
Author, “Milk, honey and falafel”
“They are our roots, they live where we are from and we have a special bond with them. This is mostly for political reasons, because they are an element of dialogue. They are at the forefront of a society that tries to be pluralistic, preventing it from ending up in the hands of Islamic fundamentalism or Jewish fundamentalism.”

Elisa Pinna is a journalist, an expert in the Middle East, and she has just published this book “Milk, honey and falafel.” She explains that the Holy Land does not belong to anyone, because it belongs to everyone. It is a huge mosaic of how each person should live at peace with the one next to them.

ELISA PINNA
Author, “Milk, honey and falafel”
“This great wealth, instead of mixing in with a single common society, creates divisions and creates grudges. It is the tendency for each community to live for themselves, with a vision of their own traditions, their history, and their own narrative.”

That is why Christians play a fundamental role as a bridge between two peoples that seem destined to hate each other. Hence, it is more necessary than ever to help them stay.

DAVID-MARIA JAEGER
Franciscan
“With the exercise of political charity, that means to influence the Western governments to commit themselves to help seek a political peace in the Jesus’ land.”

Fr. David-Maria Jaeger, who attended the presentation of the book, knows all too well about the Holy Land. He was born in Tel Aviv, in the bosom of a Jewish family. He later converted to Catholicism and became a Franciscan. Due to his experience, he has a simple, yet nearly impossible formula to solve the problem.

DAVID-MARIA JAEGER
Franciscan
“Everything is possible. War is made by men, it is not a natural disaster. If men want to make war, if they want, they can also make peace. Everything is possible. It is enough that you want it though, that both sides want it.”

That is the great challenge that its citizens have to face. They must find a way to live together that does not imply submission to some, but freedom for all people that make up the Holy Land.