Missionary sister unites Muslims, Protestants and Catholics in Africa

She spoke at an event called “Women on the Frontlines,” held at the U.S. Embassy.

Catholicism in Africa is the fastest-growing population in the world, expected to have 350 million members by 2050. It’s a country close to the heart of Pope Francis, who’s made four trips in his six-year pontificate.

Yet, while the Catholics are increasing, the number of Muslims outnumber them, being more than a quarter of the population.

Sr. Anne shares her experience with Muslims and Catholics in Africa. She says they are able to get along, when people open their mind and don’t only consider extremists.

SR. ANNE FALOLA
Missionary in Nigeria
“Everyday life is a dialogue. And we have got to learn much more about Islam because what we see in Boko Haram is just, it does not represent the whole Islam.”

This religious sister helps with human development for youth, both Catholics and Muslims, offering everything from a safe haven to a listening ear. She insists interfaith dialogue is what will propel peace.

SR. ANNE FALOLA
Missionary in Nigeria
 “We now have one center that is totally dedicated to dialogue. What we notice is that with the wave of things, before Muslims and Protestants could attend our schools. But now, there are more and more Muslim schools, which makes it that Muslims have their schools, Protestants have their schools. That’s not going to help us so much, you know?”

To combat this, she trains women of both religions with a certain skill, like sewing, so they can escape the fate of many in Africa: prostitution or human trafficking.

SR. ANNE FALOLA
Missionary in Nigeria
“We brought all the youth together, the Muslim youth, the Christian youth, they know themselves and they all came to the table. After getting trained, they went to their groups and got them trained.” 

She says human development for the people in Nigeria is just another way to unite, which is her purpose as a Catholic missionary sister.