Sister saving deformed orphaned children, destined for death by witchcraft

Sr. Stan Mumuni began the Marian Sisters of Eucharistic Love six years ago, but has been saving children for 11 years.

Nearly 11 years ago, Sr. Stan Mumuni went to work rescuing children destined for death in Ghana. They are those born with deformities or mental illnesses, who are seen as “evil” by traditionals, or followers of witchcraft, in the country.

SR. STAN MUMUNI
Founder, Marian Sisters of Eucharistic Love
For instance, a child who cannot speak. They believe he is speaking with ghosts; they believe he is communicating with the spirits. Therefore, if there is any misfortune in the village, that misfortune is attributed to this child who is born with deformities.”

Sr. Stan gave various examples. If a woman dies in childbirth, the newborn is viewed as a “wizard,” having killed the mom. For twins, one is viewed as “good” and the other “bad,” but since they don’t know who is who, they kill them both.

She explained that the life-saving work hasn’t been easy. There are no funds and she is forced to beg for food and medication for the little ones. However, she says she receives help from the local community, which is divided equally between Christians and Muslims.

SR. STAN MUMUNI
Founder, Marian Sisters of Eucharistic Love
“The Muslims actually come here to the house to donate to the children. When they come here, what they tell me is that, ‘You are the one that know God. You are the one that really is serving God. You are the one that is doing God’s will.”

Sr. Stan says their community is based on welcoming the other and respect for the different beliefs. In fact, they help both Muslim, Christian and traditional children.

SR. STAN MUMUNI
Founder, Marian Sisters of Eucharistic Love
“We do not discriminate who to take into the house when the needs arise. Without the other group, the other group might not succeed. So we know that and because of that, we embrace each other. We see each other as families.”

Sr. Stan declared the main point of the mission is to help these “innocent children” who are destined for certain death all because of the “ignorance of others in Ghana.” She cares for those who have no one to take care of themselves.

Before the pandemic hit, she would travel to America seeking donations, but that has been halted. Now, she asks for constant prayers and funds to support the small children and 10 religious women of the Marian Sisters of Eucharistic Love doing this essential work.